I Suffer From Sphenopalatine Ganglioneuralgia

Sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia is a condition that billions of people worldwide suffer from. Sphenopalatinebrainfreeze ganglioneuralgia, also known as icebergers syndrome, brain freeze or ice-cream headache, is a painful condition. But fear not. It is not fatal and is only temporary. I am sure that you have at some point in your life gotten brain freeze, and I am sure that you already know that it comes from eating or drinking something cold too quickly. But what exactly is taking place when this horrible condition strikes? Well today we clear up that mystery.

The pain is caused by the rapid cooling of the roof of the mouth, which is close to the sphenopalatine nerve, a section of an extensive bundle of nerves running from the face up into the brain.When this nerve gets cold, it fires off a danger signal that the entire head is about to become chilled and warns the vascular system to start pumping more blood to the brain to keep it warm. Vessels open up and the sudden in-rush of warm blood causes a painful sensation, which lasts anywhere from 30 seconds to 2 minutes. By that time the body has rewarmed the sphenopalantine nerve and the blood flow to the brain reduces to normal levels, stopping the pain.The source of the pain has been described as being similar to that resulting from sticking hands chilled in winter into a bucket of warm water. The sudden increase in blood flow and associated expansion causes pain. Brain freezes are called “referred pain” because the pain occurs in a location (the brain) that’s different than the location of the stimulus (the roof of the mouth.)

One third of all people are statistically susceptible to brain freezes. They are more often caused by eating ice cream than drinking an iced beverage because ice cream is colder than ice. Also, they are much more common when the weather is warm than when it’s cold, suggesting that it’s the rate or amount of temperature change that’s important.

The quickest way to relieve a brain freeze it to take a drink of warm water and hold it against the roof of your mouth. Since they are over so quickly anyway and it’s unlikely that you’re going to be holding a cup of hot water in one hand at the same time that you are holding an ice cream cone in the other, the next best thing to do is press your tongue against the roof of your mouth to rewarm the nerve.

Prevention is simple: Give up ice-cream . . . OR eat and drink very cold foods slowly.

Reference:

WikipediaBrain Freeze

AnswerBag.comWhat Causes Brain Freeze?

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4 responses to “I Suffer From Sphenopalatine Ganglioneuralgia

  1. 33. I’ll immediately grab your rss feed as I can not find your email subscription link or e-newsletter service. Do you have any? Please let me know in order that I could subscribe. Thanks.

  2. This blog is no longer active. You can follow me on my current blog at DaddysDown.com. The RSS feed for that blog can be found by clicking on the feed link on that page. Thanks for reading.

  3. Margie Panter

    A pain specialist has told me this is what he thinks I have. Mine is not temporary. its starts in my nose first thing of a morning. It is stinging and burning like needles being stuck in my nose. Then I have electrical things and itching like crazy most all day. He is talking about blocking a nerve. Could I have more info on this subject?

  4. Hmm is anyone else having problems with the pictures on this bllog loading?
    I’m trying tto destermine if its a problem on my end or if it’s the blog.
    Anny responses would be greatly appreciated.

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